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What Is Cell Isolation?

March 2020

cell-separation

Cell isolation—also referred to as cell separation or cell sorting—is the process of isolating one cell population from other cells in a heterogeneous biological sample. Targeted cells are identified, isolated, and then separated according to their type.

What Is Cell Separation and Cell Sorting?

November 2016

cell-research

If you are reading this, you probably already understand or at least have a very good idea of what cell sorting and cell separation is. Still, you would be surprised by how many times we get asked questions like, “What is the difference between cell sorting and cell separation?” We also get questions like, “What are the different ways to separate cells?” or “What is the difference between positive and …

Microbubbles and Centrifugation: How It Works

February 2016

beach-ball

Can microbubbles be pelleted by centrifugation? In short, no. At least, not a pellet that you would see at the bottom of your tube when you spin down cells. Here’s how it works.

How Many Cells Can a Microbubble Lift?

February 2016

microscope

We hear this question all the time: How many cells can a microbubble lift? For many users, the most important questions around microbubble-based separation have to do with how many microbubbles to add to a sample. Answering this question requires getting into the total lifting capacity of a microbubble. Part of the answer derives from how a microbubble engages cells, clumps of cells, or even larger structures such as spheroids …

The Physics of How Microbubbles Sort Cells

January 2016

child-in-swimming-pool

Flotation is the driving principle behind our cell sorting technology. It’s hard to imagine many other physical phenomena that humans have more of an intuition for than floating and sinking. The exact same rules of floating and sinking apply to a stem cell being lifted from a sample on the back of Akadeum’s microbubbles. In principal, it is as simple as pair of water wings that keeps a two-year-old child …

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